GETTING STARTED

Getting Started

Persons interested in services, must contact the Disability Services. Unlike in K-12 education settings, individuals at the college level must self-identify as having a disability if they think they may need accommodations. Academic accommodations are based on individual review and should be supported by appropriate documentation.

Online and Abingdon Students

Students who take courses online and in Abingdon can contact Disability Services. There is no need for students to physically visit the Wise campus to receive services.

Documentation Guidelines



Documentation Guidelines LD

Students requesting services from the Office of the ADA Coordinator at The University of Virginia's College at Wise are required to submit documentation to determine eligibility in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The following guidelines are provided in the interest of assuring that documentation is complete and accurate. The ADA Coordinator reserves the right to determine eligibility and appropriate services based on the quality, recency, and completeness of the documentation submitted. All documentation is confidential and will be maintained by the ADA Coordinator.

Guidelines:

  1. A psycho-educational or neuropsychological evaluation that provides a diagnosis of a specific learning disability must be submitted. A statement indicating the current (eleventh/twelfth grade) status and impact of the learning disability in an academic setting should be included. If another diagnosis is applicable (e.g., ADD/HD, mood disorder), it should be stated.

  2. The evaluation must be performed by a professional who is certified/licensed in the area of learning disabilities. The evaluator's name, title, and professional credentials and affiliation should be provided.

  3. The evaluation should be based on a comprehensive assessment battery:

    • Aptitude
      Average broad cognitive functioning must be demonstrated on an individually administered intelligence test, administered during high school tenure, such as the WAIS-R, WAIS-III, WISC-R, WISC-III, or WJ-R Cognitive Battery. Subscales/subtests scores should be listed.

    • Academic Achievement
      A comprehensive academic achievement battery, such as WJ-R, must document achievement deficits relative to potential. The battery should include current levels of academic functioning in relevant areas, such as reading (comprehension, decoding), oral and written language, and mathematics. Standard scores, grade levels, and percentages for subtests administered should be stated.

    • Information Processing
      Specific areas of information processing (e.g., short- and long term memory, auditory, and visual perception/processing, executive functioning) should be assessed.

    • Social-Emotional Assessment
      To rule-out a primary emotional basis for learning difficulties and provide information needed to establish appropriate services, a social-emotional assessment, using formal assessment instruments and/or clinical interview, should be conducted.

    • Clinical Summary
      A diagnostic summary should present a diagnosis of a specific learning disability; provide impressions of the testing situation; interpret the testing data; indicate how patterns in cognitive ability, achievement, and information processing reflect the specific learning disability; recommend specific accommodations based on disability-related deficits; and rule out alternative explanations for and include factors contributing to academic difficulties. 

  4. For students just graduating high school, an evaluation reflecting current levels of academic skills should have been administered during their high school tenure; for students who have been out of school for a number of years, documentation will be considered on a case by case basis. Students may be required to submit up-dated information and/or documentation.

  5. Additional documents that do not constitute sufficient documentation, but that may be submitted in addition to a psychological, psycho-educational, or neuropsychological evaluation are: an individualized educational plan (IEP), a 504 Plan, and/or an educational assessment.


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Documentation Guidelines Physical/Sensory

Students requesting services from the Office of the ADA Coordinator at The University of Virginia's College at Wise are required to submit documentation to determine eligibility in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The following guidelines are provided in the interest of assuring that documentation is complete and accurate. The Office of the ADA Coordinator reserves the right to determine eligibility and appropriate services based on the quality, recency, and completeness of the documentation submitted. All documentation is confidential and will be maintained by the ADA Coordinator.

Guidelines:

  1. Documentation must include a medical diagnosis.

  2. The diagnosis and evaluation should be made by a medical doctor or appropriate specialist licensed in the specific field of disability. The evaluator's name, title, and professional credentials and affiliations should be provided.

  3. The documentation should include the following: 

    • The stability of the disability
      Is the disability stable, progressive, fluctuating?

    • Information regarding the specific academic functions affected by and the severity of the disability
      e.g. ability to concentrate, ability to attend class regularly

    • Recommendations for academic accommodations based on specific features/symptoms of the disability
      e.g. adaptive technology/equipment

  4. The recency of the documentation is dependent on the nature/stability of the disability. 

  5. Documentation must reflect the current array of symptoms/features and level of functioning; if the documentation does not, students may be required to submit up-dated information and/or documentation.


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Documentation Guidelines Psychiatric

Students requesting services from the Office of the ADA Coordinator at The University of Virginia's College at Wise are required to submit documentation to determine eligibility in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The following guidelines are provided in the interest of assuring that documentation is complete and accurate. The ADA Coordinator reserves the right to determine eligibility and appropriate services based on the quality, recency, and completeness of the documentation submitted. All documentation is confidential and will be maintained by the ADA Coordinator.

Guidelines:

  1. Documentation must include a medical or clinical diagnosis of a psychiatric disability based on DSM-IV criteria and a rationale for the diagnosis.

  2. The evaluation must be performed by an appropriate professional: a psychiatrist, a clinical psychologist, or a clinical social worker. The evaluator's name, title, and professional credentials and affiliation should be provided.

  3. The documentation should include the following: 

    • Information regarding the severity of the disability and the specific academic functions affected by the disability and/or medication
      e.g. ability to concentrate, ability to attend class regularly, ability to interact in small/large groups

    • Recommendations for and compliance to prescriptive treatment, including medication

    • Recommendations for academic accommodations based on specific features/symptoms of disability.

  4. Documentation must reflect the current array of symptoms/features and level of functioning; if the documentation does not, students may be required to submit up-dated information and/or documentation.


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Documentation Guidelines Cognitive

Students requesting services from the Office of the ADA Coordinator at The University of Virginia's College at Wise are required to submit documentation to determine eligibility in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The following guidelines are provided in the interest of assuring that documentation is complete and accurate. The ADA Coordinator reserves the right to determine eligibility and appropriate services based on the quality, recency, and completeness of the documentation submitted. All documentation is confidential and will be maintained by the ADA Coordinator.

Guidelines:

  1. A psycho-educational evaluation that provides a diagnosis of a cognitive disability must be submitted. A statement indicating the current status and impact of the disability in an academic setting should be included. If another diagnosis is applicable (e.g., ADD/HD, mood disorder), it should be stated.

  2. The evaluation must be performed by a certified/licensed professional. The evaluator's name, title, and professional credentials and affiliation should be provided.

  3. The evaluation should be based on a comprehensive assessment battery: 

    • Aptitude
      Average broad cognitive functioning must be demonstrated on an individually administered intelligence test, such as the WAIS-R, WAIS-III, WISC-R, WISC-III, or WJ-R Cognitive Battery. Subscales/subtests scores should be listed.

    • Academic Achievement
      A comprehensive academic achievement battery, such as WJ-R, must document achievement deficits relative to potential. The battery should include current levels of academic functioning in relevant areas, such as reading (comprehension, decoding), oral and written language, and mathematics. Standard scores, grade levels, and percentages for subtests administered should be stated.

    • Information Processing
      Specific areas of information processing (e.g., short- and long-term memory, abstract reasoning) should be assessed.

    • Social-Emotional Assessment
      To provide information needed to establish appropriate services, a social-emotional assessment, using formal assessment instruments and/or clinical interview, should be conducted.

    • Clinical Summary
      A diagnostic summary should present a diagnosis of a cognitive disability; provide impressions of the testing situation; interpret the testing data; indicate how patterns in cognitive ability, achievement, and information processing reflect the disability; and recommend specific accommodations based on disability-related deficits. 

  4. For students just graduating high school, an evaluation reflecting current levels of academic skill should have been administered during their high school tenure; for students who have been out of school for a number of years, documentation will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Students may be required to submit up-dated information and/or documentation. 

  5. Additional documents that do not constitute sufficient documentation, but that may be submitted in addition to a psychological or psycho-educational evaluation are: an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP), a 504 Plan, and/or an educational assessment.


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Documentation Guidelines ADD/ADHD

Students requesting services from the Office of the ADA Coordinator at The University of Virginia's College at Wise are required to submit documentation to determine eligibility in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The following guidelines are provided in the interest of assuring that documentation is complete and accurate. The ADA Coordinator reserves the right to determine eligibility and appropriate services based on the quality, recency, and completeness of the documentation submitted. All documentation is confidential and will be maintained by the ADA Coordinator.

Guidelines:

  1. Documentation must include a medical or clinical diagnosis of ADD/HD based on DSM-IV criteria and a rationale for the diagnosis.

  2. The evaluation must be performed by an appropriate professional, a medical doctor or a clinical psychologist, who is knowledgeable regarding ADD/HD. The evaluator's name, title, and professional credentials and affiliation should be provided.

  3. The documentation should include the following:

    • Quantitative and qualitative information that supports the diagnosis

    • Summary and interpretation of assessment instruments
      Formal assessment instruments and/or clinical interview

    • Information regarding the specific academic functions affected by and the severity of the disability
      e.g. ability to sustain attention, distraction index

    • Recommendations for and compliance to prescriptive treatment, including medication

    • Recommendations for academic accommodations based on specific features/symptoms of disability

    • Investigation/evaluation of dual and/or confounding diagnosis
      e.g. mood, behavioral, neurological, learning, personality disorders

  4. Documentation must reflect the current (within the past year) array of symptoms/features and level of functioning; if the documentation does not, students may be required to submit up-dated information and/or documentation.

Neither a 504 Plan nor an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) constitute sufficient documentation but may be submitted along with a medical or clinical evaluation.


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Documentation Guidelines for PCA (Personal Care Attendant)



Personal Attendant Care Agreement(PDF)
This form must be turned into Office of Housing and Residence Life upon completion



General Information

While responsibility for attaining, training, supervising, payment, and possible replacement belongs to the student receiving care, Disability Support Services (DSS) can assist you through the process.

What is Attendant Care?

Attendant care can range from minor duties such as light cleaning or laundry needs to advance care such as bowel and bladder assistance. Attendants are sometimes roommates.  This situation is most preferable for freshmen students living in residence halls. Attendants can also be arranged on a "drop-in" basis. An individual may even choose to hire more than one person to be an attendant at the same time. Another option for attendant care is health care agencies. You must have your attendant care arranged prior to moving into university residence halls or apartments.

Who Pays for Attendant Care?

Responsibility for payment of attendants is left to the individual receiving the care; however, in some cases, payment is covered by Vocational Rehabilitation (VR). The hourly wage for attendant care through VR is typically $9.00 per hour. Your care level will be determined by you and your VR counselor. For those who are not VR clients, you could pay an attendant less or more than the prevailing rate. VR clients are responsible for all paperwork necessary to ensure his/her attendant gets paid. When you choose an attendant, the first thing that you need to do is submit an authorization form to VR for that attendant. This will authorize that attendant to get paid by VR. It is crucial that financial arrangements be understood both by the student with the disability and the attendant before the attendant begins to assist the student. 

How DSS Can Assist?

Before a prospective student with personal care needs enrolls at UVa-Wise, Disability Support Services (DSS) and the student will discuss attendant care policies and procedures. Students must have submitted appropriate documentation and register with DSS prior to requesting attendant care through campus housing. At that point, students will need to sign the PCA Policy and Agreement and submit a copy to the Office of Housing and Residence Life. Some students will need no assistance, some may need minimal help, while others may need a greater degree of attendant care. A student should not underestimate his/her abilities or potential; neither should he/she fail to honestly identify those routines and activities that do need assistance.

DSS can do the following to assist the student:

  • Help coordinate information and plans with UVa-Wise Office of Housing and Residence Life.

  • Serve as a liaison with VR regarding attendant care matters

Attendant Care Living Arrangement

Some students with disabilities and their attendants choose to live together in the same residence hall room or off-campus location (live-in). Responsibility for payment of housing of attendants on campus is left to the individual receiving the care. Some attendant situations are non-roommate arrangements (drop-in). Residence hall live-in attendants must be of the same sex. This is not true for off-campus attendees. Need and personal preference will help determine living arrangements. It is important that students who wish to live on campus complete and submit the proper forms in a timely manner so that appropriate housing arrangements can be made. Failure to do so may result in loss of housing opportunity. Students with disabilities do not receive preference in these matters.

Determination of Care Level

A student and parent(s) or current attendant should complete an attendant care checklist (similar to the one below). You will want to discuss care needs with your Vocational Rehabilitation counselor, as this is generally the source of payment. 

Attendant Care Checklist 

The following checklist is for the purpose of planning care routines and setting up expectations and responsibilities between the attendant and the attendee. It is very important that the attendee check all items necessary for his/her care. This information is used to determine the appropriate care level. A copy of this should be shared with your attendant. 

Check list is attached below.

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ATTENDANT CARE CHECKLIST.pdf56.61 KB