Courses in English

ENG 0990: Basic Skills (3)
Offered for credit/no credit. Designed for students who need remediation in speaking and writing standard English, this course integrates work in grammar, organization, spelling, and vocabulary enrichment with specific spoken and written assignments ranging from sentence construction to paragraph development and the creation of essays of substantial length. Emphasis is on mechanical correctness and rhetorical development. Classroom work is supplemented and individual problems addressed by laboratory assignment using computer software.

ENG 1010-1020: Composition (6)
Prerequisite: passing grade on the proficiency examination or successful completion of specified portions of Speech and Writing Laboratory; ENGL 101 is prerequisite to ENGL 102.
Expository writing, ranging from single paragraph to essays of some length and complexity; study of the logical, rhetorical, and linguistic structures of expository prose; the methods and conventions of preparing research papers; and argumentation. Full-time students who have not completed ENGL 101-102 or the equivalent must enroll in the appropriate course in that sequence.

ENG 1030: Composition (3)
Prerequisite: advanced placement
After a rapid survey of the modes of expository writing, this course will emphasize analytical and argumentative composition with topics drawn from selected major works of American and English literature, as well as world literature in translation. In a seminar setting, the assignments will all emphasize discussion, research and writing of high quality.

Note: All courses 200 and above presume completion of ENGL 101 and 102; credit for upper-level courses in English will not be given unless the student has successfully completed ENGL 101 and 102. A student may take either the 200 or 300 version (but not both) of the courses listed dually below.

ENG 2120 /3120: Topics in World Literature (3)
Prerequisites: ENG 1010-1020
A study of works of foreign literature in translation. Examples include The German Novel, German Short Fiction, The Russian Novel, The Contemporary Novel, The Vampire in Literature and Film, and The Double in Literature. Students seeking upper-level credit for this course will complete compositions or readings in addition to the assignments for ENGL 212.

ENG 2130/3130: Topics in American Literature (3)
A study of selected themes in American literature. Students seeking upper-level credit for this course will complete compositions or readings in addition to the assignments for ENGL 213.

ENG 2140/314: Topics in British Literature (3)
A study of selected themes in British literature. Students seeking upper-level credit for this course will complete compositions or readings in addition to the assignments for ENGL 214.

ENG 3000: Introduction to Literature (3)
A survey of the various forms of literature with emphasis on a close reading of the text. Particular attention is given to the expression of student ideas in both written and oral forms.

ENG 3020: Greek and Roman Drama in Translation (3)
A study of plays of major Greek and Roman dramatists with an interdisciplinary trans-cultural approach.

ENG 3040: Literature of the Fantastic (3)
A selection of fantastic literature within the western tradition from the pre-Christian to the modern era.

ENG 3050: The Western Literary Tradition 1 (3)
A survey of western literature from the Hebrews and Greeks through
the Renaissance.

ENG 3060: The Western Literary Tradition 2 (3)
A survey of western literature from the Neo-classical period to modernism.

ENG 3070: Arthurian Literature (3)
The origins of the legend of King Arthur in British and Continental writing and the development of Arthur in literature from the Middle Ages to the present century.  Major topics for consideration include: the origins of the legend; Arthur and the Grail myth; Arthur in epic and romance; the Lancelot and Guinevere story; Arthurian revivals in the Renaissance, 19th, and 20th centuries; and the quest for the "historical" Arthur.

ENG 3090: Asian American Literature (3)
Prerequiste: ENG 1020 or 1030
This course is designed to introduce students to the major works of Asian American writers, including the Eaton sisters, Carlos Bulosan, Maxine Hong Kingston, Amy Tan, Hisaye Yamamoto. Bharati Mukherjee, John Okada, Li-Young Lee, and David Hwang.  The course will pay particular attention to Asian Amercian diasporic culture and identity crises in Asian American communities.  Issues for discussion: immigrant legacy, Asian Amercian relations to the values and mores of the homeland or Confucian cultures, Asian American stereotypes, the "model minority" myth, family and community, and images of Asian American masculinity and femininity.  We will also examine how Asian American writers over generations of assimilation, cultural, racial, and generational conflict have conveyed unique ethnic experiences that have enriched, and even changed, our understanding of modern American life.

ENG 3100: Readings in Literature (1-2)
The reading of a list of works agreed upon by the student and the department.

ENG 3110: Women in Literature (3)
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
A study of representations of women will focus on transnational and multicultural literature by both male and female writers, with particular attention to the relationship between the traditional roles of women, female stereotypes, and the dilemmas women and women writers have encountered in search of their own identities and places.  By juxtaposing male ideas of women with women's struggles as individual selves, students will examine how a traditionally male-centered and masculinist culture and literature could be re-envisioned.

ENG 3120: Topics in World Literature (3)
See ENGL 212/312

ENG 3130: Topics in American Literature (3)
See ENGL 213/313

ENG 3140: Topics in British Literature (3)
See ENGL 214/314

ENG 3150: The Mystery Novel
Prerequisite: ENG 1020 or 1030
Designed to satisfy the general education requirement in English literature, this course will explopr major works in the mystery tradition: works covered will include classic mystery writers, such as Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie, as well as works by modern practitioners of this popular but important genre.  Students will get a background in the history of this type of novel as well as practice performing literary analysis.

ENG 3210: Advanced Composition (3)
The study of effective exposition and argumentation, with some attention to the principles of rhetoric and their application in written compositions.

ENGL 3220: Creative Writing (3)
By permission of instructor only. The writing of essays, poems, and short stories.

ENGL 323: Creative Writing (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 322 or permission of instructor
Continued practice composing various literary forms.

ENGL 325: Selected Readings from English Literature I (3)
Emphasis on major figures such as the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton. Attention is given to the heroic ideal, romance, tragedy, lyric and satire. This emphasis is combined with a close reading of texts and the writing of a series of essays, some of which reflect the student's ability to do research.

ENGL 326:Selected Readings from English Literature II (3)
Emphasis on major figures such as Austen, Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson or Browning, Shaw, Eliot, and Lawrence or Joyce. Attention is given to the democratization of the heroic ideal, the failure of the vision (the anti-hero), and the development of modernism. This emphasis is combined with a close reading of texts and the writing of a series of essays, some of which reflect the student's ability to do research.

ENGL 340:Literature for Adolescents (3)
Prerequisite: Junior standing
A study of literature for young readers from grades seven through twelve with presentation of appropriate bibliographies, indexes, review sources and teaching methods. Although this course may not be used to satisfy requirements for the major in English, it is required for English majors seeking certification for teaching and for all students seeking certification in library science. May not be used to satisfy general education requirements.

ENG 3410:An Introduction to English linguistics (3)
Elementary phonology, morphology, and syntax, with some discussion of the English vocabulary. Recommended for students certifying to teach. 

ENG 3420:History of the English Language (3)
The development of English from its beginning to the present.  This course is recommended for English majors planning to attend graduate school.

ENG 3450:An Introduction to Literary Criticism (3)
Prerequisite: Any 300-level English course
A study of critical theory combined with analysis of selected works.

ENG 3690: 16th Century British Literature
The 16th century comprises a crucial period in English political, cultural, and religious history. 

ENGL 370: 17th Century British Literature (3)

A survey of British literature from Donne through Milton.

ENGL 371: 18th Century British Literature (3)
A survey of British literature from Dryden through Johnson.

ENGL 372: 19th Century British Literature (3)
A survey of British literature from Blake through Hardy.

ENGL 373: The Early British Novel (3)
A survey of the British novel from its beginnings to Dickens.

ENGL 381: Survey of American Poetry and Prose I (3)
A survey of American literature from the colonial period to the last quarter of the nineteenth century, with emphasis on Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman and Dickinson.

ENGL 382: Survey of American Poetry and Prose II (3)
A survey of American literature from the last quarter of the nineteenth century through the modern period, with emphasis on James, Twain, and notable writers of the realist and naturalist movements.

ENGL 387, 388: Cooperative Education Project I (2-6, 2-6)
Students can obtain information from the Department Chair.

ENGL 393: Appalachian Prose and Poetry (3)
A survey of the prose, poetry and drama of the Appalachian region. The study includes research in collection of local materials.

ENGL 394: African-American Literature (3)
A survey of the prose, poetry and drama of African-American literature including works from the 19th and 20th centuries.


ENGL 400:Age of Chaucer (3)
A study of Chaucer's major works in the original and in translation.

ENGL 402:Shakespeare (3)
A study of representative plays from the Shakespearean canon.

ENGL 403:Modern British and American Poetry (3)
A survey of modern British poets from Gerard Manley Hopkins and of American poets from Dickinson to William Carlos Williams.

ENGL 404:The Modern British and American Novel (3)
A study of the modern British novel from Conrad to Greene and of the American novel from James to Faulkner.

ENGL 487, 488:Cooperative Education Project II (2-6, 2-6)
Students can obtain information from the department chair.

ENGL 490: Internship (2-3) 
Supervised experiences for students, usually in the area of their primary interests. An outline of the internship is developed by the student prior to enrollment and a paper is subsequently developed to analyze and evaluate the work experience. The area in which the internship is taken will be designated on the student's transcript. (The internship cannot be used to meet departmental requirements except as a substitute for 387, 388, 487, or 488.)

ENGL 491: Senior Seminar (1)
Discussions leading to the writing of a paper using critical analysis. (Dual listing with ENCO 491.)

ENGL 492: Senior Seminar 2 (2)
Discussions leading to the writing of a paper using critical analysis. (Dual listing with ENCO 492.)

ENGL 494: Studies in Literature (3)
Offered on demand. A study of special topics in world literature.

ENGL 495: Studies in American Literature (3)
Offered on demand. A study of special topics in American literature.

ENGL 496: Studies in British Literature (3)
Offered on demand. A study of special topics in British literature.

ENGL 497: Independent Study