Courses in Biology

BA Biology Major Checklist

BS Biology Major Checklist

 

BIO 1010: Principles of Biology(3)
Pre- or corequisite: MTH 1010 or higher, ENG 1010 or higher, or permission of instructor
An introduction to the biochemical, cellular, genetic, ecological, and evolutionary principles fundamental to all of biology.

BIO 1011: Principles of Biology Laboratory (1)
Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BIO 1010, or permission of instructor
An introduction to the laboratory methods and techniques necessary to understand the fundamental principles of biology. This course meets alternate weeks and includes one lecture hour and two laboratory hours.

BIO 1020: Introduction to Biological Diversity (3)
Pre-requisite: BIO 1010/1011, or permission of instructor
An introduction to the diversity of living organisms with an emphasis on their interrelationships and the ways in which they have solved problems common to all life forms, past and present.

BIO 1021: Introduction to Biological Diversity Laboratory (1)
Pre-requisite: BIO 1010/1011, concurrent enrollment in BIO 1020, or permission of instructor
An introduction to the diversity of living organisms with an emphasis on the diagnostic characteristics of major groups of organisms and evolutionary patterns visible throughout these groups (accompanies BIO 1020).

BIO 2010: Topics in Cell Biology (3)
Prerequisites: BIO 1020/1021 , or permission of instructor
A bridging course that expands upon fundamental concepts of cell structure and function introduced in BIO 1010 and provides the background necessary for a range of courses at the 3000 level. Three lecture hours.

BIO 2015: Laboratory Methods in Biology (4)
Prerequisites: BIO 1020/1021; or permission of instructor
This course is designed to give students hands-on experience with a wide range of basic laboratory techniques. Topics to be covered include microscopy, electrophoresis, chromatography, molecular biology and immunochemistry. Six laboratory hours.

BIO 2020: Ecology and Evolutionary Processes (3)
Prerequisites: BIO 1020/1021 or permission of instructor
An introduction to systematic biology, population genetics, evolutionary theory, physiological and population ecology, and ecosystem structure and function. Three lecture hours.

BIO 2025: Biostatistics (3)
Prerequisites: BIO 1020/1021 and MTH 1180, or permission of instructor
An introduction to biostatistical concepts and methods commonly encountered in biology. The course will cover basic descriptive statistics as well as experimental design and techniques for testing hypotheses (e.g. analysis of variance/covariance, regression analysis, and nonparametric statistics). Three lecture or laboratory hours.

BIO 2310: Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
Prerequisites: Nursing majors: BIO 1010/1011, CHM 1005. Science majors: BIO 1020/1021, CHM 1020/1021
An introduction to principles of anatomy and physiology for students intending to complete the Nursing program. This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence to give students an understanding of human form (anatomy) and function (physiology). Students will learn anatomy and physiology using a systems approach. The course will have a common theme of homeostasis. The laboratory includes study of human models, computerized tutorials, dissections, and microscopy.

BIO 2320: Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
Prerequisites: BIO 2310
An introduction to principles of anatomy and physiology for students intending to complete the Nursing program. This is the second semester a two-semester course to give students an understanding of human form (anatomy) and function (physiology). Students will learn anatomy and physiology using a systems approach. The course will have a common theme of homeostasis. The laboratory will include the study of human cadavers, models, computerized tutorials, and microscopy.

BIO 2350: An Introduction to Marine Biology (3)
Prerequisites: 8 hours of introductory biology
This course is designed for all students, regardless of intended major. Twelve field days are required in Florida to generate data for a research- based, 7-page term-paper, due one week before the end of the first summer session. Using boat- and shoreline-based collection methods, this course will survey the diversity of life along marine shorelines, intertidal and subtidal zones. The importance of coastal communities as nurseries for both pelagic and benthic species of the ocean will be emphasized. Food, lodging, transportation, and lab fees are in addition to tuition. Students who have completed BIO 3340 may not take this course.

BIO 2370: Man and His Environment (3)
Examination of human evolution with emphasis on effects of human populations on the natural world. Three class hours.

BIO 3110: Cellular Communications
Prerequisite: BIO 2010
A study of the basic mechanisms used by all cells to monitor and respond appropriately to their environment. Topics to be covered include cell adhesion molecules and cell trafficking, hormones and ligand-receptor interactions, signal transduction, transport across cell membranes and trafficking of intracellular components. Three lecture hours.

BIO 3120: Animal Physiology (5)
Prerequisite: BIO 2010, 2015
An examination of digestion and molecular transport of materials, excretion, muscle activity, gas exchange, endocrine mechanisms, and neural mechanisms responsible for maintaining organismal homeostasis. In addition, how these homeostatic mechanisms relate to an organism's ecology and evolution will be discussed. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours. 

BIO 3130: Plant Cell Function (5)
Prerequisites: BIO 2010, BIO 2015
A course dealing with structural, biochemical and physiological characteristics of cell function in photosynthetic organisms. Special emphasis will be placed on cell walls, nutrient metabolism, photosynthesis, growth regulation, and totipotency. The laboratory portion of the class will stress the practical manipulation of plant cell function. Three lecture and three laboratory hours.

BIO 3140: Comparative Embryology (5)
Prerequisites: BIO 2010, Bio 2015; Bio 3600: Molecular Genetics or a strong understanding of molecular genetics recommended.
A comparative analysis of invertebrate and vertebrate embryonic development. Topics include: gametogenesis, fertilization, gastrulation, morphogenesis and pattern formation, with emphasis on molecular, cellular and genetic basis of the developmental process. Historical and current research strategies will be discussed. The lab utilizes model systems and current experimental strategies to elucidate basic developmental processes. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours. Due to the use of live organisms, addition lab hours are usually required.

BIO 3150: Immunology and Serology (3)
Prerequisite: BIO 2010

Basic principles of antigen-antibody reactions and their application to disease diagnosis. Three lecture hours.

BIO 3210: Microbiology (5)
Prerequisites: BIO 1010/1010, BIO 1020/1021; BIO 2010 strongly recommended
An introduction to morphological and physiological characteristics of bacteria, fungi, viruses and rickettsia. Special emphasis on medically important microbes, disease production, disease treatment, and disease transmission. Six class and laboratory hours.

BIO 3220: Biomechanics (3)
Prerequisite: BIO 2020
An introduction to the biomechanics underlying animal locomotion in aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial systems. The study of form and how it can be used to understand adaptations in various environments will be covered, including insights into fossil specimens. Three lecture hours.

BIO 3230: Comparative Anatomy (5)
Prerequisites: BIO 1010/1011 and BIO 1020/1021 or equivalent
A comparative study and examination of fine and gross anatomy of vertebrate organisms, emphasizing the various tactics for survival. Laboratory requires extensive dissections, which can include the dissection of amphibians, reptiles, fish, and small mammals. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours.

BIO 3240: Evolutionary Morphology of Plants (5)
Prerequisite: BIO 1020/1021
The first half of the semester will be a comparative morphological study of the major extant plant groups with focus on those structures that distinguish the groups into evolutionary lineages. The second half will be a systematic study of the morphological features of members of our local flora and the system by which they have been taxonomically arranged.

BIO 3250: Local Flora (4)
Prerequisite: BIO 3240
An introduction to the systematic study of vascular plants native to the area. Offered Spring semesters during the second half of the semester. Six laboratory and class hours.

BIO 3260: Vertebrate Zoology (5)
Prerequisite: Eight hours of introductory biology or permission of instructor
A survey of the evolution and natural history of the vertebrates. Six class, laboratory, or field hours.

BIO 3270: Invertebrate Zoology (5)
Prerequisites: BIO 1010/1011 and BIO 1020/1021, or equivalent
A taxonomic survey of the invertebrate phyla emphasizing diversity, and key anatomical, physiological, embryological and ecological features. Three lecture and three laboratory hours.

BIO 3280: Parasitology (5)
Prerequisites: BIO 1010/1011 and BIO 1020/1021 or their equivalent.
A course in invertebrate zoology is strongly recommended A survey of the animal kingdom, paying special attention to pathogenic species. Life cycles are examined to emphasize the intimate relationship between parasite, host, and intermediate host. Etiology, morbidity, mortality and treatment of human parasitic infections are discussed. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours.

BIO 3310: Symbiosis (3)
Prerequisite: BIO 2020
A course that introduces the diversity of interactions that occur among prokaryotes, fungi, protists, plants and animals in various combinations. The interactions considered will cover the spectrum from obligate mutualism to obligate parasitism. Three lecture hours.

BIO 3320: Advanced Ecology (5)
Prerequisites: BIO 2020, BIO 2025
An examination of current topics in ecology with an emphasis on physiological, behavioral, and evolutionary ecology. The laboratory will integrate common field techniques with experimental design. Three lecture and three laboratory hours.

BIO 3330: Conservation Biology (3)
Prerequisite: BIO 2020
An introduction to the theoretical and applied aspects of the preservation of biological diversity. The emphasis will be on the ecological and evolutionary background to species and habitat conservation, current threats to biodiversity, and evaluation of conservation efforts. Three lecture hours.

BIO 3340: Advanced Marine Biology (5)
Prerequisites: BIO 2025
Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours. Lectures take place during the spring semester while the laboratory portion requires 12-14 field days in Florida during the second half of May. Lecture topics include ocean zonation, habitats, biota, wind, currents, waves, and tides plus the discussion of primary literature dealing with estuaries. The laboratory component will survey marine biodiversity using shoreline and boat- based collection techniques, and requires a research project dealing with marine ecology, behavior, anatomy, physiology, or physical oceanography. Food, lodging, transportation, and laboratory fees are in addition to tuition.

BIO 3500: Environmental Microbiology (5)
Prerequisites:BIO 1010/1011, BIO 1020/1021, CHM 1010/1011, CHM 1020/1021
An introduction to microbiology, biochemistry and bacterial physiology of concern to environmental science. Focuses on interrelationships between microorganisms and the environment, particularly aquatic systems, and the role of microorganisms in environmental degradation and in bioremediation of contaminated soil and water. Six class and laboratory hours. (NOTE:    BIO 3210 and BIO 3500 may not both be used to meet graduation requirements.)

BIO 3510: Natural History of the Appalachians (3)
Prerequisite: Eight hours of biology or permission of instructor
An introductory study of the geology, climate, soil, flora and fauna of the Appalachian range, with emphasis on Virginia. Three hours lecture, plus local field trips.

BIO 3600: Molecular Genetics (5)
Prerequisite: BIO 2010, BIO 2015
A comparative study of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetics. Both Mendelian and molecular genetics will be discussed, with an emphasis on the current knowledge of the molecular nature of genes, their roles in controlling the development and function of organisms, their inheritance and evolution. In the lab students conduct actual research into the genes regulating the development and/or function of a model organism, as well as learn current research strategies and bioinformatic analysis tools. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours. It is a very intense experience and will require additional lab hours at times.

BIO 3700: Biomedical Ethics (3)
Prerequisite: BIO 1020 or permission of instructor
An examination of the ethical dimension of topical issues in biomedical science. Topics are chosen based on current events and student interest.

BIO 3860, 3861: Cooperative Education Project I (1-6, 1-6)
Students can obtain information from the Department Chair.

BIOL 3980: Preparing for Life as a Scientist I (1)
Prerequisites: BIO 1020/1021
The objectives of this course are to provide biology majors with information on pre- and post-graduate opportunities, prepare them for graduate and professional studies related to biology by developing a résumé and Statement of Purpose, and provide them with opportunities to speak publicly on biological topics using appropriate technology.

BIO 3990: Preparing for Life as a Scientist II (1)
Prerequisite: BIO 3980
Using the scientific literature and in consultation with a faculty member, students will develop a novel grant proposal for a research project in the biological sciences and publicly present the proposal to their peers.

BIOL 4110: Virology (3)
Prerequisite: BIO 2010
A study of the basic structure and function of viruses. Emphasis will be placed on mechanisms for cell invasion, viral replication, and pathogenesis. Three lecture hours.

BIO 4130: Regulation of Transcription (3)
Prerequisites: BIO 3110, BIO 3600
A discussion of the role transcription factors play in determining the fate of a cell. Topics to be covered include a detailed look at the process of transcription, transcription factors, the physical relationship between DNA and transcription factors, and the role of transcription factors in development. Three lecture hours.

BIO 4210: Mycology (3)
Prerequisites: BIO 2015, BIO 2020
This course will take a phylogenetic view of fungal diversity and consider the significance of fungi to humans. Three lecture hours.

BIO 4220: Microbial Diversity (3)
Prerequisites: BIO 2020, BIO 3210
A course dealing with the biology and economic significance of microscopic organisms from all three domains of life. Three lecture hours.

BIO 4320: Principles of Toxicology (3)
Prerequisites: BIO 1010, CHM 1020; CHM 3010 highly recommended
An introduction to the concepts and principles of toxicology as they apply to humans and environmental health. The course discusses the fate and behavior of chemicals in the environment and the effects of pollutants on ecosystems. It defines the principles underlying the interactions of environmental chemicals with the biological systems, emphasizing chemical distribution, cellular penetration, biotransformation and elimination. Special attention to the genetic basis of toxicity by environmental agents will be given. In addition, monitoring exposure, toxicity testing, and risk assessment are discussed.

BIO 4410-4420: Clinical Training (32)
Prerequisite: Overall GPA 2.0 with 2.5 in science and mathematics
Required of all students in the Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology/Clinical Laboratory Science Program. Clinical training at a CAHEA-accredited (Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation) school of medical technology/clinical laboratory science. A twelve-month course of study involving lecture and clinical experience. Subjects include clinical chemistry and instrumentation, microbiology, hematology, immunohematology, immunology and serology, coagulation, genetics, urinalysis, and nuclear medicine.

BIO 4500: Medicinal Plants (3)
Prerequisites: BIO 2010, CHM 3010
A course dealing with the sources, biochemistry, and pharmacology of plant-derived drugs, including 'herbal' medicines. Three lecture hours.

BIO 4860, 4861: Cooperative Education Project II (1-6, 1-6)
Students can obtain information from the Department Chair.

BIO 4700: Biology Professional Internship (1)
Prerequisites: BIO 2020/2025; or permission of instructor
The professional internship provides students with an opportunity to work with and learn from professionals in an off-campus setting. Individuals participating in the internship must submit a contract clearly stating the expectations of the student, the off-campus mentor, and a sponsoring biology professor. Copies of the contract may be obtained in the Natural Sciences office. A minimum of 150 hours of work is required for one credit hour. The professional internship does NOT include shadowing experiences.

BIO 4710: Biology Laboratory Internship (1)
Prerequisites: BIO 1010/1011, BIO 1020/1021
Three hours of work per week in laboratory preparation and instruction for biology laboratories taught at UVa-Wise, under the direction of a faculty/staff member. Goals are to foster independent work habits and responsibility in a laboratory setting for majors in biology or related fields.

BIO 4950, 4951: Special Topics in Biology (1-3, 1-3)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
This course allows advanced students to pursue a biological subject not normally covered in a regularly scheduled class. Topics generally represent special fields of study or currently expanding areas of research. This course is only an addition to and not a substitution for any portion of the major requirement in biology.

BIO 4970: Independent Study (1-3)
Pre- or co-requisites: BIO 2015, BIO 2025
This course provides intensive instruction in the use of laboratory and/or field equipment for students interested in pursuing careers in biology. This course is designed both for those who plan to undertake honors research in their third/fourth years as well as those who want some practical research experience. Various methodological approaches (both current and historical) will be used in a process of scientific investigation. This course is only an addition to and not a substitution for any portion of the major requirement in biology. Copies of the contract for Independent Study may be obtained in the Natural Science office.

BIO 4990: Senior Seminar (1)
Prerequisites: Senior status, BIO 3980
The presentation and discussion of problems of current interest by faculty, visiting speakers, and students. Students are responsible for materials presented and are subject to examination.